The Google app supports doctors in caring for patients at risk for deterioration, especially with conditions where early intervention can have a major impact. 
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Doctors at Imperial College hospitals will soon be monitoring the health of patients with an app developed by Google-backed AI firm.

DeepMind is teaming up with doctors at Imperial College hospitals for a five year partnership. With the Streams app, developed by DeepMind, physicians will be able to monitor the health of patients. The app gathers data about key physiological measures and warns when readings are high or low.

“DeepMind Technologies Limited” is a British artificial intelligence company that was founded last September 2010. It was acquired by Google in 2014. The company has created a neural network that learns how to play video games in a similar fashion to humans, as well as a Neural Turing Machine, or a neural network that may be able to access an external memory like a conventional Turing machine, resulting in a computer that mimics the short-term memory of the human brain.

The Google app supports doctors in caring for patients at risk for deterioration, especially with conditions where early intervention can have a major impact. The deal will see medical professionals at three London hospitals, St Mary’s, Hammersmith and Charing Cross, getting updates and alerts on their smartphones about patients who are at risk of a sudden deterioration in their health.

Regarding to the Steams app, health employees can get notifications immediately shows the patients a result weather risk or getting seriously ill. Streams also lets clinicians securely assign and communicate about clinical tasks, and give them the data needed to make diagnoses and decisions.

“The partnership should mean doctors get vital information about a patient’s condition quicker,” as stated by Dr. Sanjay Gautama.

DeadMind collaborates with London’s Royal Free hospital that gave Google access to 1.6 million patient records. They claimed that they needed the data to help its software recognise various medical conditions including acute kidney injury.

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